Daily Reflection Sunday May 25 2008: Bread and Forgiveness

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The Lord’s Prayer:

OUR FATHER, Who art in heaven hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. Amen.

Dear Friends, sorry for the lack of posts this week, but I have been ill, from today it is back to daily reflections. Msgr. Ian+

Today is the day when most people will be celebrating the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, which I wrote about on Thursday. So I thought it would be appropriate to post today a piece on the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.

Below you will find an excerpt of a treatise by St. Cyprian on the Lord’s Prayer (Nn. 18, 22; CSEL. 3, 280-281; 283-284) and is used in the  Office of Readings for Thurs. of the 11th week in Ordinary Time, it co-relates the unity of this prayer and the Eucharist.   Cyprian was a pagan public speaker and teacher from Carthage in North Africa who converted to Christianity.  He grew so rapidly in holiness and knowledge of the Scriptures that he was appointed bishop of Carthage only two years later.  These were years of terrible persecution, and after ten years of teaching, writing, and caring for his besieged flock, this Early Church Father was apprehended by the Roman authorities and martyred.

Bread and Forgiveness:

As the prayer continues, we ask Give us this day our daily bread. This can be understood both spiritually and literally, because either way of understanding is rich in divine usefulness to our salvation. For Christ is the bread of life, and this bread does not belong to anyone at all, but to us. And so, just as we say Our Father, because he is the father of those who understand and believe, so also we call it our bread, because Christ is the bread of us who come into contact with his body.

We ask that this bread should be given to us daily, that we who are in Christ and daily receive the Eucharist as the food of salvation may not be prevented, by the interposition of some heinous sin, from partaking of the heavenly bread and be separated from Christ’s body, for as he says: I am the bread of life which came down from heaven. If anyone eats of my bread, he will live for ever; and the bread I shall give is my flesh, for the life of the world.

So when he says that whoever eats of his bread will live for ever; and as it is clear that those are indeed living who partake of his body and, having the right of communion, receive the Eucharist, so, on the other hand, we must fear and pray lest anyone should be kept at a distance from salvation who, being withheld from communion, remains separate from Christ’s body. For he has given us this warning: Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, you will have no life in you. And therefore we ask that our bread – that is, Christ – may be given to us daily, so that we who live in Christ may not depart from his sanctification and his body.

After this we entreat for our sins, saying Forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. After the supply of food, pardon of sin is also asked for.

How necessary, how provident, how salutary are we reminded that we are sinners, since we have to beg for forgiveness, and while we ask for God’s pardon, we are reminded of our own consciousness of guilt! Just in case anyone should think himself innocent and, by thus exalting himself, should more utterly perish, he is taught and instructed that he sins every day, since he is commanded to pray daily for forgiveness.

This is what John warns us in his epistle: If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us; but if we confess our sins, the Lord is faithful and just and will forgive us. In his epistle he combines two things, both that we ought to beg for mercy because of our sins and that we will receive forgiveness when we ask for it. This is why he says that the Lord is faithful to forgive sins, keeping faith with what he promised; because he who taught us to pray for our debts and sins has promised that his fatherly mercy and pardon will follow.

Canticle of the Blood
By Saint Maria de Mattias

Come, let us adore Christ, the Son of God,
who has redeemed us with his blood.

Clap your hands, all you peoples,
sing unto God with a voice of jubilation.

For you, God, glorious and mighty,
have shown us mercy.

You have not spared your only Son
but delivered him up in our behalf.

That you might redeem us from
our sins in Christ’s own blood;

That justified in the blood of Jesus
you might turn your anger from us;

That we who were separated might
be reconciled through the blood of Christ.

O God, my God, what can I render
to you for all the good you have bestowed upon me?

I will take the chalice of salvation,
and I will call upon the power of Christ’s blood.

Sing to Jesus, all you saints, and
make known the memory of his holiness.

For Christ indeed has loved us and
washed us in his blood and has
become our helper and redeemer.

May Christ be blessed forever who
has wrought such wonders in us.

Blessed be Jesus for all ages, and
may the heavens and the earth
be filled with the praises of his love.

Come, let us adore Christ, the Son
of God, who has redeemed us with his blood. Amen.

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